This is the fourth and update to our experiment on the best type of music for plant growth. Let’s take a look at how our plants did in the last week!

You can find a summary of our findings from the past month in the original article on the effects of music and plant growth.

asplenium nidus plant experiment
Date: March 15, 2019 | Days since starting the experiment: 28
  Asplenium NidusFittonia AlbivenisEpipremnum AureumMaranta LeuconeuraCrassula OvataEchinocactus Grusonii
RockClassicalControlRockClassicalControlRockClassicalControlRockClassicalControlRockClassicalControlRockClassicalControl
Day 21Height7.56.57.56.85.56.5999.57.58.59554.5444
Leaf Count8081102717173181820151414526260000
Plants3237119565335333111
Day 28Height86.87.575.76.59.59.59.5899.3554.5444
Leaf Count8183107767473212022181615506662000
Plants3237119565335333111

Asplenium Nidus:

  • The Asplenium listening to rock music only grew 2 new leaves in the last week and also lost one of the older ones, which brings the total to just one more than last Friday. However, it looks really perky and happy – it gained 0.5 inches in height since last week!
  • The one listening to classical music gained 0.3 inches in height and grew 5 new leaves, but lost 2 older, smaller ones. I also noticed some dried out tips on some of its older leaves.
  • The bird’s nest fern in the control group stayed at the same height as last week. It lost 5 older leaves but grew 10 new ones – a new record for our Aspleniums! Nevertheless, it’s the only one with yellowing leaves and also has some dried out tips on its older, bigger leaves.

Fittonia Albivenis:

  • The nerve plants listening to both types of music grew 0.2 inches in height, while the one in the control group stagnated both when it comes to height and leaf count.
  • The plant listening to rock music grew 5 new leaves and looks healthy and happy.
  • The fittonia listening to classical music grew 3 new leaves and also looks healthy and happy.

Epipremnum Aureum:

  • The Epipremnums listening to both types of music grew 0.5 inches in length on their longest stems, while the one in the control group was the only one that stayed at the same vine length.
  • Surprisingly, the pothos listening to rock music popped up more leaves than the one listening to classical music – 3 new ones on the rocker guy and only 2 on the classical music one.

Maranta Leuconeura:

  • The prayer plants listening to rock music grew 0.5 inches in stem length on their longest stems, while the one in the control group only grew 0.3.
  • The one listening to rock music registered the most progress during the last week – it popped up 3 new leaves! The one listening to classical music grew 2 new ones, which is still great progress.
  • The maranta in the control group grew one new leaf, which seems about average for a prayer plant during this time of year.

Crassula Ovata:

  • The jade tree listening to rock music surprisingly stagnated AND lost 2 older leaves – a puzzling finding, for sure.
  • The jade tree listening to classical music is healthy and happy, with 4 new leaves since last week.
  • The one listening to classical music grew 2 new leaves and looks okay.
  • No changes in plant height in neither of the specimens since last week.

Echinocactus Grusonii:

  • The cacti didn’t really grow much, but the good news is, neither of them died, either!

Conclusion

Even though classical music seems to make plants thrive more than rock music, it also seems to promote leaf browning among plants that are sensitive to this (Aspleniums and Fittonias) according to what we noticed so far.

Stay tuned for our next update on music and plant growth!

About the Author - Florina Ionescu

Hi! My name is Florina and I’ve been a plant junkie for 4 years now. I love nature, hiking, reading, watching movies, and spending time with my friends and my cat. I’m also very enthusiastic about the World Wide Web – I think it’s an amazing source of info and a great channel for communication.

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