Welcome to vertical gardening! Three are so many plusses to installing hanging plants in your home or office. Hanging plants provide lush greenery without taking up floor or table space. They keep temptation away from young children or pets and they help to purify the air. Also, they are visually interesting and beautiful!

In this article, we will look at some diverse categories of hanging plants, such as air plants, succulents, ferns as well as some unusual hanging techniques. We will offer some basic care tips as well!

Hanging Air Plants

1. Tillandsia Ionantha (Sky plant)

 

 

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This hanging plant is part of the Bromeliad family, stays small and has a short stem. Like most air plants, it originates from tropical climates and absorbs water through its leaves, not its roots, and so does not need to grow in soil.

The only limit to creating interesting hanging air plant displays is your imagination!

Light Requirements

Bright indirect sunlight

Water Requirements

Mist it regularly and soak it every few weeks

Toxicity

Non-Toxic

Difficulty

Easy to moderate

2. Tillandsia Maxima

 

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This air plant’s leaves turn from green to a deep coral and produce a bright purple flower. Most air plants only bloom once in their lives, but that bloom can last for many months. They will generate “pups” after blooming which can eventually become new plants. This type can sprout several flowers at once.

Light Requirements

Indirect sunlight but more tolerant of bright sunlight

Water Requirements

Mist it regularly

Toxicity

Non-Toxic

Difficulty

Easy to moderate

3. Tillandsia Xerographica

 

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This hanging air plant, called the Tillandsia Xerographica, originates from Mexico and Central America. It is spherical in shape with round, grayish leaves. It will slowly produce a tall spike which becomes a red or yellow flower.

Due to its shape, this hanging air plant requires less water.

Light Requirements

Bright, indirect sunlight

Water Requirements

Mist it regularly but don't soak it

Toxicity

Non-Toxic

Difficulty

Easy to moderate

Hanging Succulents

1. Donkeys Tail (Sedum morganianum)

 

 

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This dramatic hanging succulent has grayish-green trailing leaves which hang in clusters. It does well as an indoor hanging plant as well as outdoors, over rocks in a rock garden.

The leaves hold water so care must be taken not to overwater the plant – every 10 days or so is good. Like all succulents, drainage is important, and it should be planted in soil specially mixed for cactus and succulents.

Light Requirements

Bright shade to partial sun

Water Requirements

Complete watering every 10 to 14 days

Toxicity

Non-toxic

Difficulty

Moderate

2. String of Pearls (Senecio rowleyanus)

 

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This whimsical hanging succulent looks just like green pea-sized pearls as it trails over the edge of a planter. It is an easy-to-care-for hanging plant if it grows in soil specially formulated for succulents and cacti, is not overwatered, and there is good drainage in the pot.

Light Requirements

Bright light

Water Requirements

Allow the soil to dry out between waterings

Toxicity

Mildly toxic

Difficulty

Easy

3.Little Pickles (Othona capensis)

 

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The amusing name of this hanging succulent refers to the leaf shape which does resemble small pickles. Native to Africa, this slow-growing succulent has trailing stems which can extend several feet.

It produces small daisy-like flowers throughout summer and does well in hanging baskets or in an outdoor garden.

Light Requirements

Full sun

Water Requirements

Drought tolerant

Toxicity

Toxic

Difficulty

Easy

Hanging Ferns

1. Boston Fern (Nephrolepis)

 

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The Boston fern is an attractive, easy-care fern which seems to be made for a hanging basket. Its fronds have a ruffled look, are bright green, and can grow up to 6 feet long.

This hanging plant needs humidity and is an ideal plant for a bright bathroom. Soil drainage is important and should be mixed with organic material.

The Boston fern is effective in removing pollutants from the air.

Light Requirements

Bright indirect sunlight

Water Requirements

Keep the soil moist

Toxicity

Non-Toxic

Difficulty

Easy

2. Maidenhair Fern (Adiantum)

 

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There are several species of this hanging fern named for its delicate and often lacey looking fronds. The bright foliage can hide a purple underside, making this hanging fern a beautiful addition to your décor.

The Maidenhair can be a little picky however, requiring constant humidity and so is often planted in a stone-filled tray to maintain moisture. Like all ferns, this hanging fern needs to be kept from heating or air vents and in a moderate temperature (60 degrees Fahrenheit or above).

Light Requirements

Shade/Avoid bright light

Water Requirements

Keep the soil evenly moist and mist it regularly

Toxicity

Non-toxic

Difficulty

Hard

3. Asparagus Fern (Asparagus aethiopicus)

 

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The Asparagus hanging fern is not actually a fern but is fern-like and is made for a hanging basket. This plant has needle-like leaves which are soft to the touch, although the plant can be sometimes thorny. The fronds are feathery and can hang several feet.

Light Requirements

Bright, filtered light

Water Requirements

Keep the soil moist, but not wet

Toxicity

Non-Toxic

Difficulty

Moderate

Hanging Vine Plants

1. Pothos (Epipremnum aureum)

 

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This hanging vine has many varieties and is one of the easiest plants to grow. Its leaves can be dark green or variegated and are heart-shaped.

The trailing vine can grow several feet in length although it is best to prune occasionally before the plant becomes leggy. This hanging plant likes humidity so is a good choice for bathrooms, but it can also tolerate low humidity.

It is a very easy-going plant and perfect for beginners!

Light Requirements

Moderate indoor light to low light

Water Requirements

Allow the soil to dry out between waterings

Toxicity

Mildly toxic

Difficulty

Very easy

2. Ivy (Hedera)

 

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Grown indoors, Ivy is a fast-growing hanging vine with dark green leaves and stems that hang or creep. It is quite adaptable to different light situations but thrives in bright, indirect sunlight. It is another hanging vine which can become leggy and benefits from an occasional trim.

While related to poison ivy in the wild, its leaves are not poisonous although some skin irritation can occur.

Light Requirements

Bright, indirect light

Water Requirements

Keep the soil moist and mist once or twice per week

Toxicity

Toxic

Difficulty

Moderate

3. Inch Plant (Tradescantia fluminensis)

 

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The Inch Plant, commonly known as Wandering Jew or Spiderwort, is a cross between a vine and a succulent. It makes a beautiful hanging plant with its heart-shaped variegated green and purple leaves and produces delicate purple flowers.

It is at its best in a hanging basket and benefits from pinching back and pruning regularly so as not to become leggy.

Light Requirements

Bright, indirect sunlight

Water Requirements

Keep the soil moist, but not wet

Toxicity

Can cause skin irritation for pets

Difficulty

Easy

Hanging Flowering Plants

1. Lipstick Plant (Aeschynanthus radicans)

 

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The Lipstick Plant is made for a hanging basket and will add a touch of whimsy to your home. Though related to the African violet, it blooms are unusual; they form purple cups from which scarlet-colored tube-shaped flowers emerge.

This flowering plant will thrive and bloom consistently if kept in warm, (70 to 80-degree Fahrenheit) and humid conditions.

Light Requirements

Bright light

Water Requirements

Keep the soil moist, but not wet

Toxicity

Non-Toxic

Difficulty

Easy to moderate

2. Chenille Plant (Acalypha hispida)

 

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The Chenille (French for caterpillar) plant adds texture to your vertical garden. While the green leaves of this hanging plant are innocuous, the flowers hang like fuzzy red caterpillars and can grow several inches in length.

Pruning and pinching dead blossoms will enhance blooming and plant width.

Light Requirements

Full sun to partial shade

Water Requirements

Keep the soil moist

Toxicity

Mildly toxic

Difficulty

Easy to moderate

3. Trailing (Ivy) Geranium (Pelargonium peltatum)

 

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There are many types of this common annual plant, but the trailing version is spectacular in hanging baskets. Even though Ivy geraniums are often found outdoors in summer or warm climates, they winter well as hanging houseplants, adding color all year long.

With the right conditions, hanging geraniums will bloom consistently. The Ivy geranium will shed its dead blooms but can also be regularly pinched back.

Check out our Geranium care guide for more info on how to take care of this plant.

Light Requirements

Bright light

Water Requirements

Allow the soil to dry out between waterings

Toxicity

Mildly toxic to pets

Difficulty

Easy

Bonus: Hanging Techniques

1. Macramé Hanging Planters

 

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There is no doubt that hanging plants are space savers and add to your home or office décor. But how do you hang a hanging plant? Many of us first think of macramé plant hangers, which have been popular for years, hung from a ceiling hook. If you are a DIY type, macramé is a great way to create hangers. There are lots of tutorials available to show you the technique.

2.Indoor Trellis

An indoor trellis is not only space-saving but an attractive way to display several hanging plants at once. A trellis can be made by hand or purchased and can have any look which compliments your décor. Air plants or vines do especially well when mounted on this format.

3. Living Wall

 

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A living wall is a new trend in both homes and offices, both for its attractiveness and its ability to cleanse the air. A Living wall is a hanging installation where several plants are planted in soil pockets or planters.

They have a water reservoir and a pump which circulates water to each plant. Simpler, DIY versions can be made using a shipping palate and some landscaping material. Many DIY videos are available to help you plan and build a living wall.

4. Upside Down Planting

 

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An eye-catching and contemporary way to hang plants is upside down. Vegetable growers have used this method for several years, but the trend has now moved to indoor gardening as well.

An upside-down plant is a convenient, space-saving way to enjoy the greenery and the plants require less water!

5. Kokedama

 

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Kokedama is another unique way to display plants. It derives from Japanese garden art and uses a moss ball to support and display a plant. Clay-like soil is shaped into a ball and covered with moss; the plant appears to grow out of the moss.

The moss ball can be hung from the ceiling or placed on a platform. To water, the moss ball is soaked in water, plant side up, for several minutes.

Many of the plants we have discussed in this article would be appropriate for Kokedama, including ferns and vines.

Conclusion

What variety and diversity exist in the world of hanging plants! From succulents to air plants, hanging upside down or suspended in moss, hanging indoor plants give us space-saving greenery.

What has been your experience with hanging plants? Have you tried air plants or had luck with hanging vines? Have you been successful with DIY projects when hanging your vertical garden?

We would love to hear from you!

About the Author - Gail Edwards

I have been a fan of indoor plants for over 40 yearsand have over 60 plants in my home. I bought my first plant, a Schefflera, when I was a teenager and slowly began collecting and propagating different varieties of plants. Now that I am retired, I also devote time to an outdoor flower garden and a vegetable garden in the summer months. I live in Canada where the

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